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Donald B. Thurston photographs

Guide to the Donald B. Thurston photographs
1959-1964
An Alaska Historical Society collection

Collection number: HMC-1403-AHS.
Creator: Thurston, Donald B.
Title: Donald B. Thurston photographs.
Dates: 1959-1964.
Volume of collection: 0.01 cubic feet.
Language of materials: Collection materials are in English.
Collection summary: Primarily photographs related to the 1964 Alaska earthquake.

Biographical note:
Donald B. Thurston was an U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist who lived in Anchorage.

Collection description:
The collection consists of 51 35 mm color slides. Most are images of damage caused by the 1964 Alaska earthquake, primarily in Anchorage, Seward, Portage, and Valdez. Additional photos include a photograph of John Lotte (?) taken in 1959, an unlabeled image of a crashed airplane, and a 1962 image of two individuals from the Japanese fishery agency.

Arrangement: The photographs are roughly in date order by the date on the slide mount.

Digitized copies: This collection has not been digitized. For information about obtaining digital copies, please contact Archives and Special Collections.

Rights note: Copyright to the materials is held by the Alaska Historical Society. The Archives can grant permission for use of the materials.

Preferred citation: Donald B. Thurston photographs, Alaska Historical Society collections, Archives and Special Collections, Consortium Library, University of Alaska Anchorage.

Related materials: For additional materials related to the 1964 Alaska earthquake, consult the Archives topic guide.

Acquisition note: This collection was donated to the Alaska Historical Society in 2022 by Barbara Thurston.  The Historical Society retains ownership of the collection and placed it on deposit in Archives and Special Collections in 2022.

Processing information: This collection was described by Arlene Schmuland in 2022.

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